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Mole Trap SuperCat

The Mole Trap SuperCat is effective and reliable

The SWISSINNO Mole Trap has the following features:

  • Quick and easy to set up and no great strength is needed.
  • Catches moles in both directions.
  • Gives a clear above-ground visual signal when it has been activated: the ‘wings’ drop down to the sides of the trap.
  • Safe for users and pets.
  • A serious weapon for use by hunters and professional pest controllers.
  • The trap integrates into the mole's tunnel network and needs no bait to work successfully.
  • When the mole nudges the set trap, it slams shut with great force and kills the mole instantly with a powerful blow.
  • It is efficient, effective, safe and environmentally friendly.

Potential damages caused by moles.

What significant damage moles can cause many affected people notice only too late. Therefore, here are some of the most common damages by moles:

  • Damage to drainage systems, watercourses, dam banks and coastal defences through tunnelling in flood banks etc.
  • Damage to grass airstrips, over-run areas around tar macadam runways, amenity and sporting grassland etc. Moles are a nuisance and a threat to safety by caus1ng unevenness and a risk of subsidence.
  • Damage to mowing and baling machines caused by molehills.
  • Reduced quantity and quality of silage, which can be spoilt and rendered unpalatable by contamination with the soil from molehills. Detrimental effect on animal production
  • Threat to hygiene in animal husbandry as the soil excavated by moles exposes foreign bodies including the causative agents of diseases, e.g. listeriosis or botulism, which might be ingested by grazing animals e.g. sheep, cattle and horses.
  • Damage to buried cables e.g. road traffic signal cables.
  • Trigger underground security systems.
  • Disturbance of archaeological strata.
  • Secondary use of mole tunnels. Weasels may use mole tunnels to gain access to game-bird rearing pens.
  • Moles and their tunnels can also be precursors of infestation by voles and field mice.

Control moles effectively

The SWISSINNO mole trap means you can combat moles in the garden, without the use of poison or pesticides. Like all our SuperCat products, the mole trap is extremely effective and rapidly achieves results. 

Once the mole trap is positioned and correctly installed in the passage system, the trap is active and catches the first mole as soon as it passes the trap. It does not matter from which direction the mole goes into the trap, since it is accessible from both sides. So you can combat moles without luring them with a bait.

Professional pest control 

Our intensive development and many years of experience have allowed SWISSINNO to develop an optimal mole trap, which is also used by pest control professionals. 

The trap works simply and effectively, kills moles quickly and is immediately ready for use again. Since it works without bait, poison or chemicals, our mole trap is extremely practical, environmentally friendly and requires no maintenance. All you have to do is check whether a mole has been caught and if this is the case, it must be removed and the trap re-set.

How to use the Trap properly.

It is important to follow these instructions exactly and to work carefully when setting up the Trap. A badly-installed Trap catches nothing and can even make the mole wary of traps and consequently very difficult to catch

1. Locate the mole's tunnel using a probe.

2. Dig a 10cm diameter hole down into the tunnel and check the direction of the tunnel.

3. Pour loose dry soil down into the hole to fill and block the tunnel.

4. Insert the trap into the hole and push its 'legs' through the loose earth down to the bottom of the tunnel, making sure that the alignment matches the direction of the tunnel.

5. Rapidly raise and lower the 'wings' of the trap three times to make sure the 'legs' move freely through the loose soil without being impeded by stones.

6. Fill the hole round the sides of the Trap with loose soil to keep out light and fresh air.

7.  Finally, raise the 'wings' of the Trap to set the Trap

8. Check the Trap every 2-3 days. If the 'wings' have dropped to the sides of the Trap, the Trap has been sprung and has probably made a catch.

1.  Finding a suitable tunnel using a probe (such as a sharp stick or a metal rod

A suitable tunnel is 5-15 cm below ground, is straight and has no secondary branch tunnels. The simple way to locate a tunnel is to push a probe into the ground in many places along the imaginary line between two recently created molehills. When your probe suddenly plunges into the ground without resistance, you have hit a tunnel.

2. You need to dig a 10 cm diameter hole down into the tunnel to accommodate the trap

The Hole Cutter in the Swissinno Mole Trap Accessory Set makes it very easy to dig an accurate hole for the Trap to fit into perfectly. Reach with your hand down into the hole, or use the probe to check the depth and direction of the tunnel. If the tunnel is straight and not too deep, install the trap here. If the situation is not suitable, fill the hole with earth and look for a better location..


 

3.  Pour loose dry soil down into the hole to fill and block the tunnel.

To install the Trap, fill the tunnel at the bottom of the hole and the hole itself with loose earth making sure that there are no stones or hard lumps in the earth that would impede the action of the trap. Loose earth from a nearby molehill makes a good filling. Keep the filling loose; do not press it down. It is important that the earth filling spills over into the two openings of the tunnel as the trap will then be concealed behind the earth and the mole will not detect its presence. If the trap is installed without this camouflage, the mole will perceive the trap as a foreign intruder and will try to cram it full of earth (futilely setting it off in the process) and will bypass the trap by digging a tunnel under or round it. If, on the other hand, there is no sign of the trap and the tunnel seems merely to be blocked with earth, the mole will not be prompted to act defensively, but rather will dig into the blockage to repair the tunnel and will almost certainly enter the jaws of the trap with fatal consequences.

 

4. Place the trap in the loose earth; be mindful of the direction of travel and tauten

Insert the trap into the opening, press it lightly downwards, and tauten. When tautening, press the clamping arms of the trap into the tunnel wall, and the release will go down. If the ground is very firm, it may not work right away. Simply tauten again, and press a little until the ground gives way. The metal ends of the trap should sit firmly on the tunnel floor but not be pressed in too deeply.

 

5.  Snap the trap 3 times

By lightly pressing on the plastic ends, snap the trap 2–3 times and re-tauten. This ensures that the trap is not blocked, that it works properly, and closes easily.

6. Cover the sides of the trap with loose earth

Pile up some loose earth on the sides of the trap to completely cover or seal the tunnel. The trap is now optimally set.

7.  Perform a follow-up check after 2–3 days

In most cases, the mole will be caught after one or two days. It is easy to see from above whether the trap has been triggered. When pulling out the trap, press the plastic halves of the trap together in such a way that the mole is held firm and can be pulled out of the tunnel. If the trap has been triggered but no animal caught, set the trap again in another tunnel. The best way to do this is to again look for the most recent molehills or burrows. If the trap has not been triggered after 2–3 days, it is also advisable to change the location. 

Sometimes it can happen that a mole only walks into the trap after many days or weeks, but instead of waiting so long, it is faster to situate the trap better.

What damage can moles cause?
  • Moles are predators and live off worms, insects and other small animals in the soil. Damage is mainly caused by the animal's tunnelling activity.
  • In meadows and parks, the mounds are annoying and make mowing more difficult.
  • In sports fields, tunnels and mounds present a danger and can lead to injuries.
  • Footpaths or paved areas that are burrowed under can cave in.
  • Mounds and piles of earth are an annoyance in garden flower beds. 
  • Erosion damage occurs on dykes, slopes and embankments as a result of burrowing activity. 
  • Plants are disturbed in their growth by the under-rooting. 
  • Soil from the mounds gets into the grass during mowing, disturbs the silage and reduces the forage quality.

Mole tunnels underneath the paving stones in a garden shed.

Mole tunnels often run along borders, such as curbs, garden walls or similar

It is the small mound in the foreground that stands out at first. The mounds behind the curb stones are also caused by a mole, but are more difficult to recognise in the loose soil.

In the foreground, large and small molehills in the lawn. In the rear area of the lawn, one can make out slightly arched tunnels just below the turf.

How do you recognise a mole infestation?

The most typical feature that signifies the presence of moles are the universally popular and famous molehills. These are usually circular, and the material that is cast out is made up of coarse lumps. The tunnel passes down vertically from the middle of the mound.

In areas with very soft soil, in the forest, flower beds or under bushes in the mulch, there are often no mounds to be found. Here, the mole simply pushes the earth with its strong hands to the side to build a tunnel, and does not have to transport any earth upwards.

Sometimes one also finds long tunnels near the surface where the earth arches upwards and the course of the passage is clearly visible.

The passages made by a mole are horizontally oval, 3–5cm wide and often not very pronounced. Roots hang down into the passage. A mole's burrow system extends over an area of about 300–800 m², running several hundred meters in length. The passages are normally closed.

How many moles live in a den?

Moles are loners apart from when it's mating season. The males are raised only by their mothers. From August onwards, the young animals leave the mother's den and migrate at night, preferably in the rain, and look for their own territory.

How many traps should one use in the garden?

In a normal house garden with an area of approx. 200–500 m², there is usually only one mole present and a single trap is sufficient.

How long does it take to make a single catch?

In most cases, the mole is caught after one or two days. If the trap, once set, is unchanged after two to three days, move it to another location.

How can you tell the difference between a mole and a vole?
 
  • Voles, field mice, and moles often appear simultaneously in the garden.
  • Moles and voles can easily be distinguished from the typical heaps and passages relative to each animal
 
 Vole

Mole 

Erdhaufen  
  • Earth mound 
  • Flat irregular.
  • Usually penetrated by grass or roots.
  • 2-3 large mounds and several small mounds. 
  • Sideways passage.
  • Crumbly material is removed with the mouth or scraped.
 
 
  • High and round, only earth and stones.
  • Lots of fairly uniform mounds at regular intervals.
  • Passage goes from the middle downwards.
 
Maulwurffalle SuperCat Unterschiede WühlmausErdhaufen
Maulwurffalle SuperCat Erkennen WühlmausflacheHaufenabgestorben
Maulwurffalle SuperCat Unterschiede WühlmausGaenge
Maulwurffalle SuperCat Unterschiede WühlmausAmzaun
Maulwurffalle SuperCat Tunnel
Maulwurffalle SuperCat Unterschiede MaulwurfErdhaufen
Maulwurffalle SuperCat Unterschiede MaulwurfErdhaufen
Maulwurffalle SuperCat Unterschiede MaulwurfGaenge
Maulwurffalle SuperCat Unterschiede Maulwurf Erdhaufen
Maulwurffalle SuperCat Tunnel
Burrow test

The burrow test can be used on the one hand to determine whether a tunnel is even in use, and on the other hand to distinguish whether it belongs to a vole or a mole. The burrow test involves opening the tunnel in question. Moles and voles do not like such openings in their tunnel systems. Voles react very quickly to this disturbance and close the opening within a few minutes. With moles, it takes considerably longer – hours or even 1–2 days – until openings are closed again. If there is no reaction at all, the tunnel is not in use.

Care of the traps:
  • The traps should be rinsed after use, solely with water. Do not use soap or a cleaning agent. 
  • The traps must never be oiled, even with odourless oil. Oil would impair proper functioning.
The trap has been messed up by burrowing. Why is that?

Then you probably forgot to fill up the hole around the trap with loose soil. The earth camouflages
the metal parts of the trap. If you place the trap in the opening without this camouflage, the mole
will in most cases recognise the trap from afar as a foreign object, will mess the trap up with its
burrowing, and dig a bypass tunnel under or next to the trap. If, on the other hand, a tunnel
appears to be clogged with earth, no defensive behaviour is triggered on the part of the mole, but
rather, it attempts to repair the tunnel, unfailingly setting off the trap in the process.

The trap has been triggered but no mole caught. Why would that be?

Check the hole after pulling out the trap. 

It could be that the mole was not pulled out with the trap and is still in the passage.

If a mole has set off the trap but not been caught, there is usually a new passageway next to or underneath the trap. In this case, reset the trap in a different location. When setting it up, ensure that the metal ends of the clamps are well seated on the floor of the tunnel.

After several failed attempts, the mole will usually completely ignore the trap. And then the trick with the earth will not help any more.

The trap is triggered very easily; pets, children or passers-by could also be the cause.

Can moles transmit diseases to humans and animals?

Moles are not explicitly known for being carriers of disease, but as with all other wild animals, unnecessary contact with the skin should be avoided.  For this reason, gloves should always be worn when setting traps, and the hands and arms should be thoroughly washed after working.

Tricks that help when a mole cannot be caught:

Moles are naturally suspicious loners and are not easy to catch. What's more, from time to time it can happen that an animal sets off traps, escapes, and then becomes trap-shy. You can find a few "insider tips" from professionals here.

It can help to open the passage using the hole cutter 15cm ahead of and behind the trap. The additional openings distract the mole from the trap. 

Another trick is to not only lay traps, but at the same time to damage the rest of the tunnel system as much as possible. Tread into all mounds and surface passages and damage deeper passages with the search rod. This massive disturbance can also distract from the trap.

The use of Solar Mole Repellers can also lead to improved success at catching. The disturbing noises distract the mole and make it more careless.

    If all this does not help, experienced trap-layers take a two-week break and try a different trap model.

    What significant damage moles can cause many affected people notice only too late
    • Therefore, here are some of the most common damages by moles:
    • Damage to drainage systems, watercourses, dam banks and coastal defences through tunnelling in flood banks etc.
    • Damage to grass airstrips, over-run areas around tar macadam runways, amenity and sporting grassland etc. Moles are a nuisance and a threat to safety by caus1ng unevenness and a risk of subsidence.
    • Damage to mowing and baling machines caused by molehills.
    • Reduced quantity and quality of silage, which can be spoilt and rendered unpalatable by contamination with the soil from molehills. Detrimental effect on animal production
    • Threat to hygiene in animal husbandry as the soil excavated by moles exposes foreign bodies including the causative agents of diseases, e.g. listeriosis or botulism, which might be ingested by grazing animals e.g. sheep, cattle and horses.
    • Damage to buried cables e.g. road traffic signal cables.
    • Trigger underground security systems.
    • Disturbance of archaeological strata.
    • Secondary use of mole tunnels. Weasels may use mole tunnels to gain access to game-bird rearing pens.
    • Moles and their tunnels can also be precursors of infestation by voles and field mice.
    Structure of a Mole’s Residence

    A.) Feeding tunnel

    B.) Earth molehill

    C.) Laufgang

    D.) Travel runway

    E.) Food storeroom

    Professional accessories for the best application of the mole trap!

    • 1 piece tunnel location probe of 25cm length
    • Special hole digger of 6cm diameter and reinforced stainless steel body

    Outdoor

    • POISON FREE
    • /
    • ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY
    • /
    • EFFICIENT